69 World & 124 Paralympic Records Total Were Broken In Tokyo (Day 10 Records)

On the last day of the Tokyo Paralympics, 9 World and 13 Paralympic records were set. In total, 69 World and 124 Paralympic records have been broken.

2020 TOKYO SUMMER PARALYMPIC GAMES

EXPLANATION OF PARA CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM

There are 14 classifications for Paralympic swimmers, typically denoted as “S” followed by a number.
“SB” designates an athletes classification for breaststroke events
“SM” is for individual medley events
Athletes with physical impairments are classified in S1-S10, SB1-SB9, and SM1-SM10 with numbers 1-10 ranging from more severe activity limitations to less severe limitations.
Athletes with visual impairments are classified in S/SB11-13.
Athletes with intellectual impairments are classified in S/SB14.
The Paralympics are not the “Para Olympics” or anything similar. The International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee are separate organizations with separate leadership and separate events that happen to have a partnership to organize their crowned jewels more efficiently.

Day 10 Prelims

Day 10 Finals

The last day of the Tokyo Paralympics featured nine World records and 13 Paralympic records being taken down. At the conclusion of the entire meet, a total of 69 World and 124 Paralympic records were broken. Day two saw 12 World records while day six saw 18 Paralympic records.

Tokyo 2020 World/Paralympic Record Count

Day
World Records
Paralympic Records
Day 1
2
10
Day 2
12
15
Day 3
9
11
Day 4
9
13
Day 5
5
14
Day 6
10
18
Day 7
3
8
Day 8
5
11
Day 9
5
11
Day 10
9
13
Total
69
124

Taking down the first World and Paralympic record pairs of the day was Canada’s Danielle Dorris, swimming 33.51 to better the 2008 Paralympic record and 2012 World record in the S7 women’s 50 fly. In the final, Dorris broke 33 seconds for the first time at 32.99. Taking bronze was Italy’s Giulia Terzi (34.32), a new European record.

Another Paralympic record that has stood since the 2008 Beijing Games bit the dust. In the S4 men’s 50 back preliminaries, Czech Republic’s Arnost Petracek swam 41.75 to crush the standing 42.71 Games record. Later in the final, RPC’s Roman Zhdanov broke the Paralympic record and clipped half a second off his own World record with a swim of 40.99.

Swimming the first sub-46 effort in the S4 women’s 50 back in history was China’s Liu Yu, touching the wall at 45.81 and breaking the 2017 World record. Later in the final, Yu better her mark again at 44.68.

China’s Li Guizhi broke the 2012 Paralympic record in the S11 women’s 100 free to lead prelims, stopping the clock at 1:05.92 for a new Asian record. Shaving a mere five one-hundredths off her prelims Paralympics record to win the final was Guizhi, re-setting the Asian record at 1:05.87. Placing fourth in the final was USA’s Anastasia Pagonis, setting a new Americas record of 1:06.65, just 0.09s outside earning another medal.

Kicking things off in the last finals session was Ukraine’s Makysm Krypak, who set the Paralympic record in the SM10 men’s 200 IM final at 2:05.68 to take the gold medal.

Shaving five one-hundredths off the 2016 Paralympic record to win the SM10 women’s 200 IM final was Chantelle Zijderveld of the Netherlands, touching the wall at 2:24.85. Canada’s Aurelie Rivard placed fourth to set a new Americas record of 2:28.73.

Three swimmers swam under the 2016 S6 women’s 100 back World record of 1:21.43 during the final. USA’s Elizabeth Marks touched the wall first at 1:19.57, the first sub-1:20 mark in class history. China’s Jiang Yuyan set a new Asian record at 1:20.65 for silver while Germany’s Verena Schott set a European record at 1:21.16.

In the last event of the entire ten-day meet, the 34 points men’s 4×100 medley relay, two different World records were broken. Leading off for RPC was Bogdan Mozgovoi, who broke the S9 men’s 100 back World record at 1:01.00. He was then followed by Andrei KalinaAlexander Skaliukh, and Andrei Nikolaev, combining for a new relay World record time of 4:06.59. Australia swam 4:06.59 for the silver medal, a new European record.

More Day 10 Continental Records

Out of the S8 men’s 100 fly heats, USA’s Robert Griswold put up 1:02.52 to set a new Americas record.
Placing sixth in the S7 men’s 50 fly heats was South Africa’s Christian Sadie, setting a new African record of 30.57.
In the S3 men’s 200 free heats, Egypt’s Youssef Elsayed set a new African record with a time of 4:46.78.
Placing sixth in the S12 men’s 100 fly final for a new Oceanian continental record was Australia’s Braeden Jason (59.01).
Breaking his own Americas continental record from prelims to secure S8 men’s 100 fly gold was USA’s Robert Griswold, stopping the clock at 1:02.03.
Two continental records fell during the S7 men’s 50 fly final. Taking the title was USA’s Evan Austin, touching 0.05s ahead of Ukraine’s Andrii Trusov, 28.98 to 29.03. Austin’s time established a new Americas records while Trusov’s swim set a new European record.
Setting a new Asian record to win the SM5 women’s 200 IM was China’s Lu Dong at 3:20.53

FINAL MEDAL TABLE

RANK
TEAM/NPC
GOLD
SILVER
BRONZE
TOTAL
RANK BY TOTAL
1
China
19
19
18
56
1
2
RPC
17
14
18
49
2
3
USA
15
10
10
35
5
4
Ukraine
14
18
11
43
3
5
Italy
11
16
12
39
4
6
Australia
8
10
15
33
6
7
Great Britain
8
9
9
26
7
8
Brazil
8
5
10
23
8
9
Israel
6
1
1
8
14
10
Netherlands
5
6
6
17
9
11
Belarus
5
1
0
6
17
12
Azerbaijan
4
0
0
4
21
13
Japan
3
7
3
13
11
14
Hungary
3
4
0
7
16
15
Canada
3
3
2
8
14
16
Mexico
3
1
6
10
12
17
New Zealand
3
1
1
5
18
18
Spain
2
9
3
14
10
19
Colombia
2
4
4
10
12
20
Germany
2
0
3
5
18
21
Singapore
2
0
0
2
24
22
Chile
1
2
0
3
22
23
Ireland
1
1
0
2
24
24
Cyprus
1
0
1
2
24
25
France
0
2
3
5
18
26
Argentina
0
2
0
2
24
27
Czech Republic
0
1
0
1
29
28
Greece
0
0
3
3
22
29
Uzbekistan
0
0
2
2
24
30
Croatia
0
0
1
1
29
30
Kazakhstan
0
0
1
1
29
30
Lithuania
0
0
1
1
29
30
Poland
0
0
1
1
29
30
Switzerland
0
0
1
1
29
30
Turkey
0
0
1
1
29
On the last day of the Tokyo Paralympics, 9 World and 13 Paralympic records were set. In total, 69 World and 124 Paralympic records have been broken.

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